Joseph DuMouchelle

Joseph DuMouchelle explores rising untreated sapphire prices

Joseph DuMouchelle 

With the value of untreated sapphires rocketing, qualified gemologist Joseph DuMouchelle takes a closer look at the market.

Commanding prices as much as 80 percent or more higher than their counterparts, ‘untreated’ sapphires, as they’re known, are rocketing in value. A graduate gemologist, appraiser, and auctioneer, jewelry expert Joseph DuMouchelle offers a closer look at the market for these rare, untreated gemstones.

Explaining so-called gemstone ‘treatments,’ Gemological Institute of America Alumni Association international board member and former head of the Accredited Gemologists Association Joseph DuMouchelle reveals that any process beyond cutting and polishing a stone for color, clarity, or durability falls into this bracket, also known as ‘enhancing’ gemstones.

“Treatments and enhancements are common in the gemstone market,” DuMouchelle explains, “and may be carried out in order to improve the appearance or wearability and durability of a stone.”

“However,” he continues, “it’s extremely important to consider the potential value implications prior to applying treatments or enhancements to any gemstone.”

According to DuMouchelle, particularly desirable natural gems, such as sapphires, routinely command as much as a 50 percent or more premium over their enhanced counterparts. “Natural sapphires command significantly higher prices today than treated or enhanced examples,” the expert reveals, “despite those which have undergone radiation exposure and heat treatments, for example, often being visually more appealing and colorful in many people’s opinions.”

Indeed, the International Gem Society suggests that mid-quality untreated blue sapphires will sell for approximately 30 percent more than a treated stone of equal quality. “Top quality untreated stones, though,” adds DuMouchelle, “especially if they’re large, have recently commanded premiums of 80 percent and above, and it’s a premium which is rising.”

Naturally colored sapphires get their range of hues from traces of chromium, iron, titanium, and other elements found deep underground.

Beyond heat treatments and radiation exposure, other forms of enhancement available in the industry involve dyeing, coating, fracture filling, diffusion treatments, and oiling. “Aside from oiling, all of these processes are permanent,” DuMouchelle explains, wrapping up, “so it’s crucial to consider the value implications before going ahead with any such process, especially when taking sapphires and other similarly rare or desirable gemstones into consideration.”

Joseph DuMouchelle is co-founder and president of Joseph DuMouchelle Fine & Estate Jewellers, LLC. Established over a decade ago by DuMouchelle and his partner, Melinda Adducci, the business now boasts locations in New York, Michigan, and Florida. As an international auction house, Joseph DuMouchelle Fine & Estate Jewellers holds vintage diamond, signed jewelry, and timepiece auctions year-round, selling to clients worldwide. Experts in vintage signed jewelry and rare, colored gemstones, the business has also successfully handled and sold unique pieces from significant collections and belonging to famous faces including Marla Maples and Nat King Cole.

To find out more about Joseph DuMouchelle Fine & Estate Jewellers, please head to http://www.josephdumouchelle.com/.

Joseph DuMouchelle Offers Professional Insight Into Gemstone Treatments and Value Factors

Gemologist Joseph DuMouchelle explains gemstone treatments and enhancements, and how such processes affect values.

When it comes to gemstone pricing, applied treatments and enhancements, versus a stone remaining natural beyond cutting and polishing, represent among the most critical factors in determining values. A graduate gemologist, appraiser, and auctioneer, jewelry expert Joseph DuMouchelle explains more on the subject.

Defined by experts as any treatment process beyond cutting and polishing a stone for color, clarity, or durability, so-called ’enhancements’ are common in the gemstone market according to DuMouchelle, a graduate gemologist, appraiser, auctioneer, and co-founder and president of Joseph DuMouchelle Fine & Estate Jewellers, LLC. Alongside fellow co-founder and partner Melinda ’Lindy’ Adducci, the international auction house business enjoys locations in New York, Michigan, and Florida, and regularly sells to clients in more than 80 countries worldwide.

“Treatments and enhancements may be carried out in order to improve the appearance or wearability and durability of a stone,” he explains, “although it’s important to consider the potential effects on value before taking this route with any gemstone.”

Natural gems can, says DuMouchelle, routinely command as much as an 80 percent or more premium over so-called ’enhanced’ specimens, which have undergone, for example, radiation exposure or heat treatments. “Natural sapphires command significantly higher prices today than their arguably often somewhat more attractive and colorful, to many an eye, treated or ’enhanced’ counterparts,” he explains.

In other cases, however, and with gemstones such as citrine, a variety of quartz, little or no demand exists for natural stones. “Accordingly, while treating citrine has no negative effect on the value of the stone, with no demand for natural examples, opting not to ’enhance’ it means it has no tangible value in the first place,” DuMouchelle explains.

Further to radiation exposure and heat treatments, other forms of enhancement involve coating, dyeing, fracture filling, oiling, and diffusion treatments. With the exception of oiling, all of these processes are permanent, according to DuMouchelle. “Ultimately, value factors tied to treatments and enhancements are markedly more significant with larger, rarer gemstones,” suggests the expert.

“Accordingly, it’s important that when dealing with valuable, or potentially valuable, specimens, including rough or uncut examples, anyone unsure on the price implications of applying treatments and other enhancements should consult with a qualified expert in the first instance,” the Joseph DuMouchelle Fine & Estate Jewellers co-founder adds, wrapping up.

Joseph DuMouchelle is a member of the international board for the Gemological Institute of America Alumni Association and former head of the Accredited Gemologists Association. To learn more, please visit http://www.josephdumouchelle.com/.

Joseph DuMouchelle explains the secret of finding antique hidden treasures

 

Estate buyer and graduate gemologist Joseph DuMouchelle reveals the importance of experts in identifying hidden treasures from the world of fine art and antiques.

Reflecting on a priceless House of Faberge creation known as the Third Imperial Easter Egg resurfacing after close to a century almost without trace, estate buyer and graduate gemologist Joseph DuMouchelle explains more about the role of fine art and antiques experts in finding, identifying, and preserving such works, often worth hundreds of thousands or millions of dollars.

“It’s all about recognizing a hidden treasure,” suggests DuMouchelle, an estate buyer, graduate gemologist, appraiser, and auctioneer, “and, at Joseph DuMouchelle Fine & Estate Jewellers, we’re the experts that know.”

“Several years ago, for example,” he continues, “an individual hailing from the Midwest but who has subsequently remained anonymous discovered that their recent jumble sale find was, in fact, the Third Imperial Easter Egg, created by the House of Faberge for the Russian royal family in the 1800s.”

Estimated to be worth more than $30 million, the relatively diminutive 3.2-inch tall Faberge egg is supported by elaborate gold lion paw feet while a single diamond acts as its opening mechanism.

Dating back to 1887, the treasure had been considered lost since the 1920s until when, in 2011, evidence of the item resurfaced in a mid-1960s auction catalog, giving new hope to antiques experts of finding the missing Faberge piece. “Despite outward appearances, it ultimately takes an expert eye,” says DuMouchelle, “not necessarily to spot such a find in the first instance, but to identify its true value, and its authenticity.”

Indeed, in this instance, the Joseph DuMouchelle Fine & Estate Jewellers co-founder refers to the so-called Third Imperial Easter Egg as ‘the Holy Grail of art and antiques.’

“Confirmed by a renowned Faberge expert from London, England, to be the piece in question, the man’s jumble sale find did, truly, represent what I’d call the Holy Grail of art and antiques,” explains DuMouchelle. The buyer, it’s understood, had originally planned to melt down the tiny golden egg in an effort to turn a $500 profit, based purely on its gold content.

While he had overestimated the value of the egg’s materials, which, says DuMouchelle, were roughly equivalent to what he’d paid for it, he had not only massively underestimated but had almost entirely overlooked its value as a work of art. “So far removed from the world of art and antiques was the man that he had entirely failed to recognize the object’s true value,” he adds.

After an internet search, however, in an effort to sell the item for more than its largely disappointing value based solely on its gold content, he was left ‘hardly able to comprehend’ the true potential worth of the object which was now in his possession, according to DuMouchelle.

The Third Imperial Egg has since been purchased by a private collector.

“Truly recognizing and identifying a hidden treasure often relies on a thoroughly qualified eye,” DuMouchelle adds, wrapping up, “which is why it’s vitally important that those in possession of potentially valuable antiques or works of art approach an expert in the field, such as myself or one of the team here at Joseph DuMouchelle Fine & Estate Jewellers, for a professional appraisal and further insight.”

Joseph DuMouchelle reveals growing demand for vintage signed jewelry at auction

Joseph DuMouchelle 

Jewelry expert Joseph DuMouchelle offers a closer look at increasing demand for vintage signed jewelry at auction in the U.S. and globally.

In much the same way that fine art is signed by artists, quite often, so is exceptionally well-made jewelry, with signed pieces marked with a signature which denotes the designer, maker, or manufacturer. Particularly desirable among vintage pieces, demand for signed jewelry at auction has never been higher, according to experienced jeweler and qualified gemologist Joseph DuMouchelle.

“Vintage signed jewelry has never been more sought-after or in higher demand at auction,” reveals DuMouchelle, an estate buyer, graduate gemologist, appraiser, auctioneer, and co-founder and president of Joseph DuMouchelle Fine & Estate Jewellers, LLC.

Easily identified by experts such as DuMouchelle, styles of signature or means of marking signed jewelry can vary, particularly with vintage pieces. “With the appropriate magnifying glass, known as a loupe, it’s possible to both identify a signature and to get a valuable, closer look at a particular piece of jewelry,” he explains.

While looking for a signature, there’s also the opportunity to look for other, interesting hallmarks, such as whether the piece is 18k or 24k gold, for example, according to DuMouchelle. “Learning to read different, particularly vintage signatures is an excellent way to give oneself the upper hand in dealing with vintage jewelry,” adds the expert and Joseph DuMouchelle Fine & Estate Jewellers co-founder.

From vintage Cartier art deco brooches to 1960s diamond-embellished Tiffany rings, pieces of vintage signed jewelry are today commanding higher prices than ever before at auctions throughout the United States and around the world. “Prewar, postwar, and mid-century pieces of signed jewelry from top brands and designers have become increasingly sought-after in the last decade,” DuMouchelle explains, “both here in the U.S. and internationally.”

Vintage signed pieces from jewelers and luxury retailers such as Tiffany & Co. and Italian designer brand Bulgari, as well as Van Cleef & Arpels, French luxury goods conglomerate Cartier, and American jeweler Harry Winston have all commanded record or near-record auction prices in recent years.

“Demand only looks set to increase from here on out,” suggests DuMouchelle, wrapping up, “so there’s never been a better time to buy or, arguably, sell vintage signed jewelry, particularly at auction.”

A member of the international board for the Gemological Institute of America Alumni Association and former head of the Accredited Gemologists Association, Joseph DuMouchelle is co-founder and president of Joseph DuMouchelle Fine & Estate Jewellers, LLC. Established over a decade ago by DuMouchelle and his partner, Melinda ‘Lindy’ Adducci, the business now boasts locations in New York, Michigan, and Florida. As an international auction house, Joseph DuMouchelle Fine & Estate Jewellers holds vintage diamond, signed jewelry, and timepiece auctions year-round, selling to clients in more than 80 countries worldwide. Experts in vintage signed jewelry and rare, colored stones, the business has also successfully handled and sold unique pieces from major collections and belonging to famous individuals including Marla Maples and Nat King Cole.

To learn more about Joseph DuMouchelle Fine & Estate Jewellers, please visit http://www.josephdumouchelle.com/.

Joseph DuMouchelle

Joseph DuMouchelle explains how natural blue diamonds are setting records

Jeweler and gemologist Joseph DuMouchelle offers insight into the rise of record-breaking natural blue diamonds.

An estate buyer, graduate gemologist, appraiser, auctioneer, and jeweler, Joseph DuMouchelle is the president and co-founder of Joseph DuMouchelle Fine & Estate Jewellers, LLC. Here, the jewelry and precious gem expert—raised amid a family-run estate and auction business with a 91-year history—reveals more about how natural blue diamonds are setting records.

“Blue diamonds are particularly noteworthy at the moment; a variety which exhibits all of the same inherent qualities of more traditional diamonds, but with the additional element of beautiful, natural blue coloring in the stone,” reveals DuMouchelle, who has more than 30 years of expertise in the appraisal of jewelry. He and his partner, Melinda ‘Lindy’ Adducci, specialize in buying, selling, appraising, and auctioning larger fine diamonds, fancy color diamonds, natural colored stones, estate, signed and antique jewelry, and objets d’art.

Among the rarest gems and becoming increasingly desirable in recent years, blue diamonds are naturally colored by trace amounts of boron present in the stones’ crystalline lattice structures, according to Joseph DuMouchelle. “They’re much rarer than similarly desirable natural pink diamonds,” he adds, “with only violet, purple, and red stones more difficult to come by.”

DuMouchelle’s company provides valuable hands-on service to appraisers, jewelers, gemologists, attorneys, bank officers, collectors, and individual sellers. “In doing so, we help them to achieve record values for selling their larger diamonds, colored stones, signed and estate jewelry, and other gems, primarily at auction,” adds the expert.

Of colored stones, in particular, DuMouchelle continues, “Blue diamonds can range from pale, sky blue in color to intense, deep blue shades, often assigned names such as royal, baby, midnight, or navy blue, for example.”

Incredibly rare and increasingly in demand, DuMouchelle goes on to explain that natural blue diamonds are today setting record prices both in the U.S. and internationally. “Blue diamonds of more than 3 carats are currently fetching record-breaking prices of $1.5 million or more per carat,” he adds, wrapping up, “with the Natural Color Diamond Association reporting between a 12 and 17 percent year-on-year increase in prices annually since 2002.”

A member of the international board for the Gemological Institute of America Alumni Association and former head of the Accredited Gemologists Association, Joseph DuMouchelle is co-founder and president of Joseph DuMouchelle Fine & Estate Jewellers, LLC. Established over a decade ago, the business now boasts locations in Michigan, New York, and Florida. As an international auction house, Joseph DuMouchelle Fine & Estate Jewellers holds diamond, jewelry, and timepiece auctions year-round, selling to clients in over 80 countries worldwide. Experts in rare, colored stones, the business has also successfully handled and sold noteworthy pieces from major collections and belonging to famous individuals including Nat King Cole and Marla Maples.

To find out more about Joseph DuMouchelle Fine & Estate Jewellers, please visit http://www.josephdumouchelle.com/.